Herman’s Hermits

Herman’s Hermits

Herman's Hermits

Herman’s Hermits are an English beat rock and pop group formed in 1964 in Manchester, originally called Herman and His Hermits and featuring lead singer Peter Noone. Produced by Mickie Most, they charted with number ones in the UK and in America, where they ranked as one of the most successful acts in the Beatles-led British Invasion. They also appeared in four films, two of them vehicles for the band. Source – Wikipedia.org

I’m into Something Good” is a song composed by Gerry Goffin (lyrics) and Carole King (music) and made famous by Herman’s Hermits. The song was originally recorded (as “I’m into Somethin’ Good“) by Cookies member Earl-Jean on Colpix Records in 1964. It entered the U.S. Cash Box Top 100 charts in the US on July 4, 1964 and spent 8 weeks there, reaching a high of number 42 on August 15, 1964, and number 38 Billboard.

On 26 July 1964, Herman’s Hermits recorded the song as their debut single, reaching number one in the UK Singles Chart on 30 September 1964, and staying there for two weeks. The song peaked at number 13 in the US later that year and number 7 in Canada. Source – Wikipedia.org

Herman’s Hermits

Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” is a popular song written by British actor, screenwriter and songwriter Trevor Peacock. It was originally sung by actor Tom Courtenay in The Lads, a British TV play of 1963, and released as a single on UK Decca.

The best-known version of the song is by Herman’s Hermits, who took it to number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 in May 1965, and number one in Canada the month before. The single debuted on the Hot 100 at number twelve — the third highest debut of the decade (after the Beatles’ “Hey Jude” and “Get Back”). The Hermits never released the track — or their other US 1965 number one, “I’m Henry VIII, I Am” — as a single in their native Britain. “Mrs Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” was recorded as an afterthought in two takes and featured unique muted lead and rhythm guitar by Derek Leckenby and Keith Hopwood and heavily accented lead vocals by Peter Noone, with backing vocals from Karl Green and Keith Hopwood. The band never dreamed it would be a single let alone hit number one in the US. According to Noone the song was well known to British bands; it would often be performed at birthday parties, substituting the surname of the girl whose party was being celebrated, i.e., “Mrs. Smith” or “Mrs. Jones” instead of “Mrs. Brown”. Source – Wikipedia.org

hermans-hermits

Herman’s Hermits

I’m Henery the Eighth, I Am” (also “I’m Henery the VIII, I Am” or “I’m Henry VIII, I Am“; spelled “Henery” but pronounced “‘Enery” in the Cockney style normally used to sing it) is a 1910 British music hall song by Fred Murray and R. P. Weston. It was a signature song of the music hall star Harry Champion.

Joe Brown included the song on his first album A Picture of You in 1962. But in 1965, it became the fastest-selling song in history to that point when it was revived by Herman’s Hermits, becoming the group’s second number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, dethroning “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”. Despite that success, the single was not released in the UK. The song is one of the shortest (in length) number one singles in the US of all time.

In the well-known chorus, Henery explains that his wife had been married seven times before, each time to another Henery:

I’m ‘Enery the Eighth, I am,
‘Enery the Eighth I am, I am!
I got married to the widow next door,
She’s been married seven times before
And every one was an ‘Enery
She wouldn’t have a Willie nor a Sam
I’m her eighth old man named ‘Enery
‘Enery the Eighth, I am!

However, in the Hermits’ version, Peter Noone ends each chorus with “I’m her eighth old man, I’m ‘Enery” and never sings “named”. Source – Wikipedia.org

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